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REVOLUTIONS BOOK ONE
REVOLUTIONS BOOK TWO
REVOLUTIONS BOOK THREE
REVOLUTIONS BOOK FOUR
REVOLUTIONS BOOK FIVE
REVOLUTIONS BOOK SIX

 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK ONE1r
Ch. 1: The Universe Is Spherical 1v
Ch. 2: The Earth Too Is Spherical 2r
Ch. 3: How Earth Forms a single Sphere with Water 2r
Ch. 4: The Motion of the Heavenly Bodies Is Uniform, Eternal, and Circular or Compounded of Circular Motions 3r
Ch. 5: Does Circular Motion Suit the Earth? What Is its Position? 3v
Ch. 6: The Immensity of the Heavens Compared to the Size of the Earth 4v
Ch. 7: Why the Ancients Thought that the Earth Remained at Rest in the Middle of the Universe as its Center 5v
Ch. 8: The Inadequacy of the Previous Arguments and a Refutation of them 6r
Ch. 9: Can Several Motions Be Attributed to the Earth? The Center of the Universe 7v
Ch. 10: The Order of the Heavenly Spheres 8r
Ch. 11: Proof of the Earths Triple Motion 10r
Ch. 12: Straight Lines Subtended in a Circle 13r
Table of the Straight Lines Subtended in a Circle 15v
Ch. 13: The Sides and Angles of Plane Rectilinear Triangles 19v
Ch. 14: Spherical Triangles 20v
 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK TWO26v
Ch. 1: The Circles and their Names 26v
Ch. 2: The Obliquity of the Ecliptic, the Distance between the Tropics, and the Method of Determining These Quantities 27r
Ch. 3: The Arcs and Angles of the Intesections of the Equator, Ecliptic, and Meridian; the Derivation of the Declination and Right Ascension from These Arcs and Angles, and the Computation of them 27v
Table of Declinations [of the Degrees of the Ecliptic] 29r
Table of Right Ascensions 29v
Table of Meridian Angles 30r
Ch. 4: For Every Heavenly Body Situated outside the Ecliptic, provided that the Bodys Latitude and Longitude Are Known, the Method of Determining its Declination, its Right Ascension, and the Degree of the Ecliptic with which it Reaches Mid-Heaven 31r
Ch. 5: The Intersections of the Horizon 31r
Ch. 6: The Differences in Noon Shadows 31v
Ch. 7: How to Derive from one another the Longest Day, the Distance between Sunrises, and the Inclination of the Sphere; the Remaining Differences between Days 32v
Table of the Difference in the Ascensions on an Oblique Sphere 34r
Ch. 8: The Hours and Parts of the Day and Night 36v
Ch. 9: The Oblique Ascension of the Degrees of the Ecliptic; How to Determine What Degree Is at Mid-Heaven when Any Degree Is Rising 36v
Ch. 10: The Angle at which the Ecliptic Intersects the Horizon 37r
Table of the Ascensions of the Zodiacal Signs in the Revolution of the Right Sphere 38r
Table of the Ascensionsin the Oblique Sphere 39r
Table of the Angles made by the Ecliptic with the Horizon 40r
Ch. 11: The Use of These TAbles 40v
Ch. 12: The Angles and Arcs of Those Circles which Are Drawn through the Poles of the Horizon to the Ecliptic 40v
Ch. 13: The Rising and Setting of the Heavenly Bodies 41r
Ch. 14: The Investigationof the Places of the Stars, and the Arrangement of the fixed Stars in a Catalogue 42r; 46v
Descriptive Catalogue of the Signs and Stars: I. Those which Are in the Northern Region 52r
II. Those which Are in the Middle and near the Zodiac
III. Those which Are in the Southern Region
 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK THREE71r
Ch. 1: The Precession of the Equinoxes and Solstices 71r
Ch. 2: History of the Observations Proving that the Precession of the Equinoxes and Solstices Is Not Uniform 71v
Ch. 3: Hypotheses by which the Shift in the Equinoxes as well as in the Obliquity of the Ecliptic and Equator May Be Demonstrated 73r
Ch. 4: How an Oscillating Motion or Motion in Libration Is Constructed out of Circular [Motions] 74v
Ch. 5: Proof of the Nonuniformity in the Precession of the Equinoxes and in the Obliquity 75v
Ch. 6: The Uniform Motions of the Precession of the Equinoxes and of the Inclination of the Ecliptic 78r
The Uniform Motion of the Precession of the Equinoxes in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 80r
The Uniform Motion of the Precession of the Equinoxes in Days and Periods of Sixty Days 80v
The Nonuniform Motion of the Equinoxes in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 81r
The Nonuniform Motion of the Equinoxes in Days and Periods of Sixty Days 81v
Ch. 7: What Is the Greatest Difference between the Uniform and the Apparent Precession of the Equinoxes? 82r
Ch. 8: The Individual Differences between These Motions, and a Table Exhibiting Those Differences 83r
Table of the Prosthaphaereses of the Equinoxes and of the Obliquity of the Ecliptic 84r
Ch. 9: Review and Correction of the Discussion of the Precession of the Equinoxes 84v
Ch. 10: What Is the Greatest Variation in the Intersections of the Equator and Ecliptic? 76r
Ch. 11: Determining the Epochs of the Uniform Motions of the Equinoxes and the Obliquity 85r
Ch. 12: Computing the Precession of the Vernal Equinox and the Obliquity 86r
Ch. 13: The Length and Nonuniformiyu of the Solar Year 87r
Ch. 14: The Uniform and Mean Motions in the Revolutions of the Earths Center 89v
Table of the Suns Simple Uniform Motion in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 90r
Table of the Suns Simple Uniform Motion in Days, Periods of SixtyDays, and Minutes of a Day 90v
Table of the Suns Uniform Composite Motion in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 93r
Table of the Suns Uniform Composite Motion in Days, Periods of SixtyDays, and Minutes 93v
Table of the Suns Uniform Motion in Anomaly in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 91r
Table Suns Anomaly in Days and Periods of SixtyDays 91v
Ch. 15: Preliminary Theorems for Proving the Nonuniformity of the Suns Apparent Motion 94v
Ch. 16: The Suns Apparent Nonuniformity 96v
Ch. 17: Explanation of the First and Annual Solar Inequality, together with its Particular Variations 98r
Ch. 18: Analysis of the Uniform Motion in Longitude 98r
Ch. 19: Establishing the Positions and Epochs for the Suns Uniform Motion 99r
Ch. 20: The Second and Twofold Inequality Imposed on the Sun by the Shift of Apsides 99v
Ch. 21: How Large Is the Second Variation in the Solar Inequality? 101r
Ch. 22: How thw Solar Apogees Uniform and Nonuniform Motions Are Derived 102r
Ch. 23: Determining the Solar Anomaly and Establishing its Positions 102r
Ch. 24: Tabular Presentation of the Variations in the Uniform and Apparent [Solar Motions] 102v
Table of the Solar Prosthaphaereses 103r
Completion of the Table of the Solar Prosthaphaereses 103v
Ch. 25: Computing the Apparent Sun 104r
Ch. 26: The Nuchthemeron, that Is, the Variable Natural Day 104v
 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK FOUR106v
Ch. 1: The Hypotheses concerning the Lunar Circles, according to the Belief of the Ancients 106v
Ch. 2: The Defect in Those Assumptions 107v
Ch. 3: A Different Opinion about the Moons Motion 108v
Ch. 4: The Moons Revolutions, and the Details of its Motions 109v
The Moons Motion in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 111r
The Moons Motion in Days, Periods of Sixty Days, and Day-Minutes 111v
The Moons Motion in Anomaly in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 112r
The Moons Motion in Anomaly in Days, Periods of Sixty Days, and Day-Minutes 112v
The Moons Motion in Latitude in Years and Periods of Sixty Years 113r
The Moons Motion in Latitude in Days, Periods of Sixty Days, and Day-Minutes 113v
Ch. 5: Exposition of the First Lunar Inequality , which Occurs at New and Full Moon 114r
Ch. 6: Verification of the Statements about the Moons Uniform Motions in Longitude and Anomaly 117v
Ch. 7: The Epochs of the Lunar Longitude and Anomaly 118r
Ch. 8: The Moons Second Inequality, and the Ratio of the First Epicycle to the Second 118v
Ch. 9: The Remaining Variation, in which the Moon Is Seen Moving Nonuniformly away from the [First] Epicycles Higher Apse 119r
Ch. 10: How the Moons Apparent Motion Is Derived from the Given Uniform Motions 119v
Ch. 11: Tabular Presentation of the Lunar Prosthaphaereses or Normalizations 121r
Table of the Moons Prosthaphaereses 121v
Ch. 12: Computing the Moons Motion 122v
Ch. 13: How the Moons Motion in LatitudeIs Analyzed and Demonstrated 123r
Ch. 14: The Places of the Moons Anomaly in Latitude 124r
Ch. 15: The Construction of the Parallactic Instrument 125v
Ch. 16: How the Lunar Parallaxes Are Obtained 126r
Ch. 17: A Demonstration of the Moons Distances from the Earth, and of their Ratio in Units of which the Earths Radius = 1 127v
Ch. 18: The Diameter of the Moon and of the Earths Shadow at the Place where the Moon Passes through It 128v
Ch. 19: How to Demonstrate at the Same Time the Distances of the Sun and Moon from the Earth , their Diameters, the Diameter of the Shadow where the Moon Passes through. It and the Axis of the Shadow 129r
Ch. 20: The Size of These Three Heavenly Bodies, Sun, Moon, and Earth, and a Comparison of their Sizes 130v
Ch. 21: The Apparent Diameter and Parallaxes of the Sun 130v
Ch. 22: The Moons Varying Apparent Diameter and its Parallaxes 131r
Ch. 23: To What Extent Does the Earths Shadow Vary? 131v
Ch. 24: Tabular Presentation of the Individual Solar and Lunar Parallaxes in the Circle which Passes through the Poles of the Horizon 132r
Table of Solar and Lunar Parallaxes 134r
Table of the Radii of the Sun, Moon, and [Earths] Shadow 134v
Ch. 25: Computing the Solar and Lunar Parallax 135r
Ch. 26: How the Parallaxes in Longitude and Latitude Are Separated from each other 135v
Ch. 27: Confirmation of the Assertions about the Lunar Parallaxes 137r
Ch. 28: The Mean Conjunctions and Oppositions of the Sun and Moon 137v
Table of Conjunction and Opposition of the Sun and Moon 138r
Ch. 29: Investigating the True Conjunctions and Oppositions of the Sun and Moon 138v
Ch. 30: How Conjunctions and Oppositions of the Sun and Moon at which Eclipses Occur May Be Distinguished from Others 139v
Ch. 31: The Size of a Solar and Lunar Eclipse 140r
Ch. 32: Predicting How Long an Eclipse Will Last 140r
 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK FIVE142r
Ch. 1: The Revolutions and Mean Motions [of the Planets] 142v
Saturns Parallactic Motion in Years and Periods of 60 Years 144r
Saturns Parallactic Motion in Days, Periods of 60 Days, and Fractions of Days 144v
Jupiters Parallactic Motion in Years and Periods of 60 Years 145r
Jupiters Parallactic Motion in Days, Periods of 60 Days, and Fractions of Days 145v
Mars Parallactic Motion in Years and Periods of 60 Years 146r
Mars Parallactic Motion in Days, Periods of 60 Days, and Fractions of Days 146v
Venus Parallactic Motion in Years and Periods of 60 Years 147r
Venus Parallactic Motion in Days, Periods of 60 Days, and Fractions of Days 147v
Mercurys Parallactic Motion in Years and Periods of 60 Years 148r
Mercurys Parallactic Motion in Days, Periods of 60 Days, and Fractions of Days 148v
Ch. 2: The Planets Uniform and Apparent Motion, as Explained by the Theory of the Ancients 149r
Ch. 3: General Explanation of the Apparent Nonuniformity Caused by the Earths Motion 149v
Ch. 4: In What Ways Do the Planets Own Motions Appear Nonuniform? 150v
Ch. 5: Derivations of Saturns Motion 152r
Ch. 6: Three Other More Recently Observed Oppositions of Saturn 154r
Ch. 7: Analysis of Saturns Motion 156v
Ch. 8: Determining Saturns Places 157r
Ch. 9: Saturns Parallaxes Arising from the Earths Annual Revolution, and Saturns Distance [from the Earth] 157v
Ch. 10: Expositions of Jupiters Motion 158v
Ch. 11: Three Other More Recently Observed Oppositions of Jupiter 160r
Ch. 12: Confirmation of Jupiters Uniform Motion 162v
Ch. 13: Determining the Places of Jupiters Motion 163r
Ch. 14: Determining Jupiters Parallaxes, and its Height in Relation to the Earths Orbital Revolution 163r
Ch. 15: The Planet Mars 164r
Ch. 16: Three Other More Recently Observed Oppositions of Planet Mars 166r
Ch. 17: Confirmation of Mars Motion 167v
Ch. 18: Determining Mars Places 168r
Ch. 19: The Size of Mars Orbit in Units whereof the Earths Annual Orbit Is One Unit 168r
Ch. 20: The Planet Venus 169v
Ch. 21: The Ratio of the Earths and Venus Orbital Diameters 170v
Ch. 22: Venus Twofold Motion 171r
Ch. 23: Analyzing Venus Motion 172r
Ch. 24: The Places of Venus Anomaly 175r
Ch. 25: Mercury 175v
Ch. 26: The Place of Mercurys Higher and Lower Apsides 176v
Ch. 27: The Size of Mercurys Eccentricity, and the Ratio of its Circles 177r
Ch. 28: Why Mercurys Elongations at about the Side of a Hexagon [= 60, from the Perigee] Look Bigger than the Elongations Occuring at Perigee 178v
Ch. 29: Analysis of Mercurys Mean Motion 179v
Ch. 30: More Recent Observations of Mercurys Motions 180v-182r
Ch. 31: Determining Mercurys Places 195v
Ch. 32: An Alternative Account of Approach and Withdrawal 196r
Ch. 33: Tables of the Prosthaphaereses of the five Planets 197r
Table of Saturns Prosthaphaereses 182v
Table of Jupiters Prosthaphaereses 183v
Table of Mars Prosthaphaereses 184v
Table of Venus Prosthaphaereses 185v
Table of Mercurys Prosthaphaereses 186v
Ch. 34: How to compute the Longitudinal Places of These Five Planets 187v
Ch. 35: The Stations and Retrogradations of the Five Planets 197v
Ch. 36: How the Times. Places, and Arcs of Retrogression Are Determined 199r
 
REVOLUTIONS BOOK SIX188v
Ch. 1: General Explanation of the Five Planets Deviation in Latitude 188v
Ch. 2: The Theory of the Circles by which These Planets Are Moved in Latitude 190r
Ch. 3: How Much Are the Orbits of Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars Inclined? 192v
Ch. 4: General Explanation of Any Other Latitudes of These Three Planets 193v
Ch. 5: The Latitudes of Venus and Mercury 203r
Ch. 6: Venus and Mercurys Second Latitudinal Digression, Depending on the Inclination of their Orbits at Apogee and Perigee 204r
Ch. 7: The Size of the Obliquation Angles of Both Planets, Venus and Mercury 205r
Ch. 8: The Third Kind of Latitude, which Is Called the Deviation, in Venus and Mercury 207v
Latitudes of Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars 210r
Latitudes of Venus and Mercury 211r
Ch. 9: Computing the Latitudes of the Five Planets 212r



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